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Dr. Arnd Bernaerts

Author in Climate Change Matters – Oceans Govern Climate

http://www.seaclimate.com/_ToC/_ToC.html   ------   HOME, ToC   A1, A2, A3, B, C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8, C9, D, E1, E2, E3, E4, E5, E6, F, G1, G2, G3, H, I, J, K-pdf, L-pdf   



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Foreword:

By Dieter E. Koop, Oceanographer.

To minimise the danger of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) by carbon dioxide emissions, international institutions require an investment of about 10 times the material cost of the entire World War II within the next few decades. The book deals with the “climate change” issue as well but from a completely different perspective, namely the threat of climatic change by human activities in the marine environment since sailing the seas with screw driven vessels during the last 150 years. The book proves that four months of activities at sea in autumn 1939 had been sufficient to generate the coldest winter in Europe since the Little Ice Age and that six years of global naval war were enough to contribute to the only global cooling period since the world got warmer since about 1850, which lasted from 1940 to the 1970th.

As oceanographer with a professional focus on North Sea and Baltic research, I felt competent enough to do the proof reading for this book. It was pure amazement to me. The ruthless Nazi regime dragged Europe into WWII, and a few months later Europe faced the coldest winter since about 1820. 70 years have passed and science has no idea of what had caused the extreme winter 1939/40. Even worse, there is no sign of interest in the matter although two further extreme winters, and a global cooling period of three decades followed. Even during peace time the huge shipping and fishing industry has the potential to influence the seasons and to contribute to global warming, which climatology has, to my knowledge, never investigated. Meteorology and oceanography should be dismayed that they failed to understand the climatic changes during two world wars, and for not having coordinated their research better to avoid such horrible gaps in understanding the climatic change issue from an oceanographic perspective. This fascinating book is a huge contribution to improve the knowledge of the influence of human activity on climate.
[cont.//; ca. +250 words]

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BoD Book on Demand, 2012, Paperback  232 Pages,
ISBN 978-3-8448-1284-8 € 22,50


At: BoD Book on Demand

The Second World War stands for the criminal madness of German Nazi government. Less known is their responsibility for the only climatic shift from warm to cold in an otherwise constantly warming world over the last 150 years.

Not knowing the reason for the biggest climatic shift since industrialization, which started in winter 1939/40, rectifies to speak about failures of meteorology. Only four months into Second World War Northern Europe experienced the coldest winter in 100 years. The reason: plain physics! Naval war in Northern European seas released the summer heat too quickly. Polar air got free access to Europe. The same applies to the second and third war winter. Europe was back in the Little Ice Age. After Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7th, 1941 naval war became a global affair. In close conformity with naval war in European seas, and subsequently in the Pacific, a pronounced global cooling took place, which lasted until about the mid 1970s.

Furthermore, a thorough research of strong warming in the Northern Hemisphere from winter 1918/19 to winter 1939/40 would have revealed a convincing link to naval war in Europe from 1914 to 1918. But climatology does not care! The connection between two naval wars and two climatic changes within 25 years has not yet been investigated and explained. If they had warned governments about the threat of climate change, as their successors currently do with the "greenhouse effect", naval activities in two World Wars may have been prevented, or at least been limited.

Claims to understand climate should be regarded as a failure as long as meteorology is unable to explain the two most pronounced climatic shifts during the last century and the role two world wars had in this game. These two events would show that the oceans have a dominate role in the climate system, and man is able to change its direction by intensive activities in the marine environment. It took four months to generate the extreme regional winter 1939/40; and subsequently a few years to contribute to global cooling lasting for three.

The book should alter the debate on climate change!


Oceans Matter: Reflecting on writings
by Dr. Arnd Bernaerts

Posted on 07 April 2015
by Ron Clutz

In response to my water world post, I was shown the wonderful phrase coined by Dr. Bernaerts:

“Climate is the continuation of oceans by other means”.

In was in 1992 he wrote in Nature appealing to the Rio conference to use the UN Convention on the Law of the Seas (UNCLOS) to better manage human impacts on the oceans, and thereby address climate concerns. Needless to say, that call fell on deaf ears.

He later elaborates: “Presumably science would serve the general public better when they would listen to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) who said: “Water is the driver of nature”. Some say that nature rules climate, but water rules the nature on this earth, and the water on earth is so synonymous with the oceans and seas that it can be said: Climate is the continuation of the oceans by other means.”

Dr. Bernaerts is certainly a man worthy of respect and admiration – an expert in maritime law, a passionate marine conservationist, and an historian of naval warfare. All of these are subjects where I have little background knowledge and much to learn.
I see him as a spokesman for ocean scientists, whose views have been little considered in the IPCC rush to judgment upon CO2. Dr. Bernaerts says quite a lot about this at his website:
http://www.whatisclimate.com/

It takes some time to understand how his material is organized, with several websites to explore, but there’s lots of data, naval history, graphs and charts to peruse and expand one’s understanding. 
[cont.//;  about 600 words more]

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Preparing and publishing of this web-site became necessary when WIKIPEDIA
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